As Nail Gun Injuries Become More Common, Take Steps To Reduce Risk

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A new report takes a look at the increased rates of nail gun injuries taking place across the country and the world.  Research from the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine recently illustrated the increased injury rates, finding that the non-dominant hand of younger men is reportedly the part of the body most susceptible to harm.  This is in line with the CDC’s finding that most injuries in America are those affecting a person’s arms and hands.

These things make sense when you realize how a nail gun is used.  In the 87 situations analyzed for the aforementioned research, nearly a third required emergency room intervention while a staggering 58% needed to be corrected via surgical means.

What makes nail gun injuries dangerous is that they can tear through tendons, tissue, and bones alike, and since they usually occur in environments that are anything but sterile, infections are a distinct possibility.

There are precautions suggested by the CDC that users should take in order to reduce the potential for injury.  First, persons who are not trained on usage should not be wielding these products.  For employers, that means training must take place prior to work and policies must be in place to govern continued function.

The best nail guns to use are those that have a full sequential trigger, but this isn’t the only equipment that should be on hand.  Eyewear and protective gloves aren’t a bad idea, and when an injury does occur, first aid and reporting should take place immediately.