Workplace Accidents Decline As OSHA Seeks Further Improvements

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Statistics have just come out that point to a drop in the overall number of workplace fatalities across the country, and while this is certainly a trend that one would hope continues, there is still room for improvement.

The data, which is being applauded by the Secretary of Labor, hails from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.  The figures show that there were 3.2 fatalities for every 100,000 full time members of the workforce last year, adding up to a total of 4,383 deaths.  That’s a decline from 3.2 fatalities per 100,000 in 2011.

Though glad to see a drop in the number of deaths, the Labor Secretary is still troubled by certain trends suggested by the data.  For instances, deaths in the gas and oil industry are increasing as jobs are added.  Deaths were also on the rise in the construction field.

In a bid to reduce these fields’ fatality rates, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is enacting a campaign geared toward construction fall prevention.  The agency points out that many injuries and fatalities might be avoided in three ways.

First, employers and workers should put together a safe plan of action prior to any work being conducted.  Once that’s done, workers should have the appropriate gear that will allow them to carry out the job as safely as possible.  Finally, workers must be given adequate training so that they know the proper way to use those tools.