Parents Can Contribute To Their Teens' Driving Safety

Posted on

Fall classes are going to be starting up soon, and thus teenagers will be on the roads in droves heading to and from high school and college.  That’s not to mention the fact that teens could be engaging in last minute summer road trips.  Parents with kids in the teen demographic are likely worried about inexperience coming back to haunt their teen, but thankfully, a new report provides a few valuable tips that parents can consider in order to boost safety.

The most important thing that a parent can do is instill a sense of responsibility within their driving teens.  When a teen knows that the consequences of dangerous driving are going to affect their wallets, they’re more keen on driving cautiously.  Tell your teens that they are expected not just to pay for gas, but for any repairs that might be required in the wake of a crash and also for traffic citations if their dangerous maneuvers lead them to be pulled over a by a cop.

Teens should also have a deep understanding of traffic offenses in the state of California.  A valid driver’s education course should take care of this, but it’s worth reminding your teens often about the illegality of certain acts.  Stress that cellphones have no place at the wheel.  That means no texting, no talking, and even no hands-free talking.  While not technically illegal just yet, studies have revealed the threat posed by voice communications.  You should also talk to your teens about the various rules governing the age of passengers they can transport and in what numbers.

You ought to be willing to take away driving privileges if a teen breaks one of the rules you lay out.  Driving contracts are available from sites like AAA for those parents interested.  And perhaps the best way to ensure that teens are sticking to your stipulations is by adhering to them yourself.  If your teenager sees you eating a cheeseburger while talking on a cellphone at the wheel, he or she will be more willing to indulge in similar activities.  Be a paragon of driving virtue so that your teen picks up only good habits.

When your teen reaches driving age, your insurance rates are likely going to go up.  This is understandable given the propensity of teens to be in fender benders, and you’ll want adequate insurance in case the crash turns out to wreak serious damage.  You should conduct research about not just insurance, but also vehicles themselves.  Some vehicles have better ratings when it comes to safety and younger drivers, and you should invest in such safety-minded automobiles for your teen.