Ford Survey Highlights Tendency Toward Dangerous Driving Behaviors

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Ford has released a survey which seeks to identify dangerous driving behaviors among various demographics, and the information is worth understanding so that we can all remove distraction and other reckless habits from our driving lives.

Penn Schoen Berland administered the study, which surveyed 1,000 people, half of whom were teens and half of whom were adults, although the lion’s share of the research appears to be focused on teen driving habits and parents’ opinions on such.

Around the same amount (62% vs. 61%) of teens copped to letting other passengers or eating and drinking distract them from driving.  Just over half admitted to MP3 usage, while 42% said the music they listen to is loud enough to prevent them from hearing other automobiles.

Parents, for their part, largely explained that they had certain concerns about the activities their teens partake in while at the wheel.  But despite this, slightly more than a quarter have invested in some sort of safe driving system to improve their teens’ driving.

There was also a distinct difference reported between males and females, with women typically driving safer despite a tendency to use their phones at greater rates than men.  That could be because the dangers of a cellphone were eclipsed by the larger percentages of men who admitted to drunk driving, aggressive driving, and speeding.