Avoid The Sunscreen Mistakes That Can Have a Longterm Impact

Posted on

There are a lot of misconceptions out there about sunscreen and its proper usage.  The Food and Drug Administration recently altered labeling requirements of such products so that consumers could be better informed of what they’re actually getting when they buy a product, but there still exists myriad mistakes that an individual could make when it comes to sun protection.  To make sure you don’t fall into that trap, you might disabuse yourself of some of the faulty notions described in a new report.

Far too many people put themselves at risk for skin cancer by either not putting on sunscreen at all or not coating their skin with adequate levels of sunscreen.  Understand that there’s no tried and true amount of covering that will do the trick for everyone.  A child has far less surface area to cover than a six and a half foot tall adult male, and thus you can’t apply the same amount of sunscreen to each individual.  Make sure that you’re applying an ample amount to every inch of exposed skin.

Still more people will make the mistake of only putting on sunscreen one time, figuring that an application near the beginning of a trip will be enough to offer protection.  But the truth is that even the best sunscreens offer protection for only a couple of hours.  And depending on your level of activity, you should be applying the sunscreen at even shorter intervals; for instance, if you’re exercising or swimming.

Don’t think that sunscreen is only necessary for a trip to the beach or the pool.  If you’re going to be outside for an extended period of time, then you should apply sunscreen to exposed patches of skin no matter the activity.

What’s surprising to many is that this rule doesn’t just pertain to sunny days.  Serious sunburns and skin damage can accumulate even when the skies are overcast.  Clouds aren’t necessarily an impediment to UV rays, and you want to make sure to protect your skin even when the sun struggles to peek out.

Don’t count on a sunscreen with a great SPF to do all the work.  The higher the SPF, the better, but no SPF offers complete protection from all of the sun’s rays.  Protecting your skin will depend on your willingness to put on sunglasses, a hat, and other clothing that can offer the shade needed to avoid rays.  And instead of just sitting outside baking all day, you should take breaks and go inside during times when the sun is at its apex.