Changes on the Way For Nicotine Replacement Therapy Labels

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The Food and Drug Administration is making changes to the way they oversee nicotine replacement therapies, removing some warnings because they believe that heretofore perceived threats have now been disproven with the arrival of data from a host of clinical trials and other research.

Specifically, the FDA is no longer concerned that over the counter NRTs pose an addiction danger that’s higher than any other product containing nicotine.  The Commissioner of the agency believes that stringent warnings specifying that NRTs should not be used in conjunction with other nicotine-containing items such as cigarettes might actually dissuade some people from seeking out this potential addiction-kicking product.

Thus, such warnings explaining that an NRT should not be taken together with other NRTs or nicotine products will no longer be required, although users are still being asked to heed the usage instructions contained on the packaging. If a therapy is supposed to be used for eight weeks, for instance, a consumer should stick to that timetable.  Consumers are also still advised to begin an NRT the day they stop their nicotine consumption.

It might be awhile before these warnings change, and thus consumers are still being asked to heed the labeling and speak with a doctor prior to usage.  He or she can instruct you on what course of action would be wise and advise you of any potential side effects to look out for.