California Teens Identify Distracted Driving Through Roadwatch Program

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A recent study attempted to ascertain just how prevalent distracted driving is by tasking students across California with keeping tabs on those drivers who engage in some type of distracting behavior.

The study, known as Roadwatch, was the result of a partnership between the California Friday Night Live Partnership and the Allstate Foundation.  To compile data, students from 26 different counties took to intersections near their education institutions to observe drivers in the area.  In total, the students were able to report more than 7,000 instances of distracted driving along 70 different intersections.

Utilizing a cellphone was not the only activity that was recorded.  In fact, a wide range of other distracting behaviors were reported as well.  Leading the list was eating or drinking behind the wheel.  This activity accounted for 2,028 of the overall distractions that were noted.  Not surprisingly, using a cellphone was right behind, and texting and talking were neck and neck.  Texters accounted for 1,062 distractions, while chatting on the phone narrowly edged it out with 1,103 of the distractions.

Other activities were also engaged in by distracted drivers.  Smoking, turning up the radio to excessive volumes (either with or without headphones), being distracted by a pet, or grooming oneself were among the other activities reported during the study.