Know The Facts Behind the Stryker Rejuvenate & ABG II Hip Stem Recall

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Recalls get issued on a regular basis, most of them concerning products that you might never even come into contact with and thus don’t have to worry about.  But perhaps the most serious recalls are those that involve medical devices.  After all, patients rely on such devices to improve their quality of life and allow them to experience a pain-free existence.  When a defect becomes apparent, the damage and pain can be limitless.

A recall has been issued by Stryker Orthopedics on their Rejuvenate Modular and ABG II modular-neck hip stems.  These devices, which enable doctors to correct an individual’s hip biomechanics, are in danger of corroding in the area of the modular-neck junction.  Given the danger, there are things you as a patient should know if they’ve had either of these devices implanted, as evidenced by this in-depth analysis from Stryker.

Know The Signs 

Although the number of people who experience this defect is low, it can happen.  As such, patients should be on the lookout for adverse reactions in the tissue surrounding the implant.  The defect typically manifests in the form of swelling or pain near the device.  Once such damage has begun to make itself apparent, the surgeon who conducted your operation should be spoken to at once.  He or she may rule out things like periprosthetic sepsis and aseptic loosening.

What Do I Do Once the Defect Has Been Diagnosed?

As stated above, your surgeon should be consulted immediately.  He and she will be able to advise you on the best course of action.  In certain instances, a revision surgery might be necessitated to correct the problem.  Should you have additional questions, Stryker has set up a call center that affected patients are able to consult.  Again, though, no final decision should be made until a physician has been consulted.

I Don’t Have Symptoms 

Given the sheer number of patients with these Stryker units out there, not everyone is going to experience this type of adversity.  For those worried they might have the device implanted, consult your medical records.  Your surgeon should also be able to inform you what kind of device was implanted.  Even if you discover you have the implant, that doesn’t mean you should rush out to get a revision surgery.  Patients should instead continue to follow the post-op plan put in place by their physicians, and be ready to call their surgeon should the need arise.

Now What? 

That’s the ultimate question, isn’t it?  When you experience pain related to a defective medical device, it’s important to know that you have options.  An expert surgeon is vital, but so is a qualified medical device recall lawyer.  When it comes to the Rejuvenate Modular and ABG II modular-neck hip stems, it’s better to be safe than sorry.  Call an experienced attorney so that you can explore your legal options.