Sidecars make motorcycles more dangerous

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Motorcycle safety experts recommend that novice bike riders stick to smaller, easier to control motorcycles as they’re learning to operate the vehicle. Some motorcycle riders believe that adding a sidecar to their motorcycle will make it easier to control, but representatives from the Canada Safety Council’s Gearing Up Motorcycle Rider Training Program warn that adding a sidecar can actually make a motorcycle more difficult to operate. Sidecars don’t lean with the motorcycle on turns and must be independently controlled and braked in order to keep control of the motorcycle, a complicated responsibility that can cause difficulty for even experienced motorcyclists. The setup for a motorcycle sidecar rig is also a complicated process that is crucial for proper handling. Smaller motorcyclists with lower body weight will have a more difficult time controlling their motorcycles with the added weight of a sidecar. Sidecars also require a larger, heavier motorcycle, which will be more difficult to control than a smaller sport bike. If a smaller motorcycle is uncomfortable, experts advise adjusting the bike’s height. Novice riders might also consider riding a three wheel motorcycle, or trike. The trike also won’t lean into corners, but it is easier to control than a sidecar.

As a San Francisco car accident lawyer, I am hopeful that motorcyclists and motorists alike will practice safer driving habits on the roadways. If you or a loved one has been injured in an accident involving any sort of vehicle, please consider hiring a car accident attorney in Bakersfield.