Some Citizens Demand New Warning Labels on Non-Intact Meat

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Some government officials would like to see new warning labels on certain cuts of meat.

At issue is the process known as mechanical tenderization.  The process involves using either needles or blades to help tenderize tough cuts of certain types of meat.  It works by breaking down meat’s connective tissues and muscle fibers, and in some cases involves injecting a marinade into the meat itself.

Some safety-conscious citizens believe that this puts the meat at a greater risk of being infected with bacteria like E. coli.  They think that the same needles that can tenderize a slab of beef can also push bacteria deeper into the product.  Because of that, there’s a large number of people who want such slices of meat to have a label that describes the meat as “non-intact” and warns of a greater risk of infection and a need for a higher cooking temperature.

For their part, many persons involved in the meat industry believe that there’s simply not any proof to back such a claim that there’s an increase in bacterial contamination.  They want more analysis before something rash is done.

This comes on the heels of Wednesday’s recall of 2,000 pounds of Town & Country beef.

This is an issue I’ll be following closely as a Riverside personal injury lawyer.  I’ve long emphasized the importance of labels, as I think it’s vital that consumers know every potential safety risk associated with their food.  However, I also understand as a Bakersfield personal injury attorney that careful research must be done before conclusions are jumped to.